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image: Next Generation: Nanowire Forest

Next Generation: Nanowire Forest

By | September 26, 2012

Researchers show that nanowire-based biosensors can collect and detect proteins in one chip.

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image: Next Generation: Breathing Nanotubes

Next Generation: Breathing Nanotubes

By | September 20, 2012

Flexible nano-sized tubules that self-assemble could be a step forward for dynamic nanostructures and perhaps drug delivery.

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image: Next Generation: In Vivo Drug Factories

Next Generation: In Vivo Drug Factories

By | August 13, 2012

Researchers use UV light to stimulate protein production in nano-sized delivery capsules in mice.

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image: Next Generation: Regulated Wrinkles

Next Generation: Regulated Wrinkles

By | August 9, 2012

Researchers devise a way to create predictably patterned microwrinkles.

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image: Next Generation: Ciliated Sensor

Next Generation: Ciliated Sensor

By | July 30, 2012

Researchers create a sensitive, flexible mechanosensor with possible applications in biomedical sensing and artificial skin technology.

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image: Next Generation: Robotic Eye

Next Generation: Robotic Eye

By | July 13, 2012

Researchers create a robotic eye that mimics real muscle movement.

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image: Next Generation: Separation Two Ways

Next Generation: Separation Two Ways

By | June 26, 2012

Researchers designed a microfluidics chip to separate cells using gravity and a force field.

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image: Next Generation: The Heart Camera

Next Generation: The Heart Camera

By | June 19, 2012

A new camera system allows researchers to measure multiple cardiac signals at once to understand how they interact to control heart function.

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image: Next Generation: The Brain Bot

Next Generation: The Brain Bot

By | May 29, 2012

A 30-year-old technique to record the electrical activity of neurons gets a robotic makeover.

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image: Next Generation: Good Vibrations

Next Generation: Good Vibrations

By | May 23, 2012

Adding texture to a lotus-leaf-like surface lets researchers control the movement of liquid droplets, and provides a cheap alternative for microfluidic applications.

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