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image: WHO To Convene MERS Virus Panel

WHO To Convene MERS Virus Panel

By | July 7, 2013

An expert committee will decide whether to escalate efforts to combat the novel coronavirus that is spreading throughout the Middle East.

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In Chapter 3, “From Mating to Conception,” author Robert Martin explores the question of why humans and other primates frequently engage in sexual intercourse when females are not fertile.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | July 1, 2013

Denial, Probably Approximately Correct, Permanent Present Tense, and Against Their Will

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image: Sea Bugs

Sea Bugs

By | July 1, 2013

Ocean viruses can impact marine ecosystems in several ways.

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image: Widening the Fertile Window

Widening the Fertile Window

By | July 1, 2013

Women may be able to store viable sperm for longer than a week, thus contributing to apparent variability in pregnancy lengths.

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image: An Ocean of Viruses

An Ocean of Viruses

By | July 1, 2013

Viruses abound in the world’s oceans, yet researchers are only beginning to understand how they affect life and chemistry from the water’s surface to the sea floor.

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image: The Art of Science

The Art of Science

By | June 21, 2013

Princeton scientists and engineers create a stunning collection of scientific images better suited for a gallery than a lab meeting.

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image: Distantly Related Viruses Proliferate Similarly

Distantly Related Viruses Proliferate Similarly

By | June 12, 2013

Whether infecting hot spring-dwelling microbes or humans, viruses co-opt the same group of proteins to assemble themselves and break out of cells.

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image: Opinion: Going International

Opinion: Going International

By and | June 10, 2013

US universities need to reach across their own borders to retain global scientific preeminence.

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image: Opinion: The Dilemma of Diversity

Opinion: The Dilemma of Diversity

By | June 10, 2013

The NIH remains a Caucasian-dominated workforce. Why haven’t the agency’s efforts to diversify been successful?

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