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The new findings, obtained from cell culture experiments, could explain the link between infection with the virus during pregnancy and infant microcephaly.

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image: A Triple Threat

A Triple Threat

By | May 22, 2017

The mosquitoes that carry Zika may be able to transmit two other viruses at the same time.

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The antibodies bind conserved viral parts, allowing them to neutralize all five Ebola types.

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image: Two Confirmed Cases of Ebola in Congo

Two Confirmed Cases of Ebola in Congo

By | May 15, 2017

More than a dozen other individuals are suspected of infection in the central African nation.

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image: Zika's Economic Burden

Zika's Economic Burden

By | May 11, 2017

A new analysis estimates that the viral disease could cost between $183 million and more than $10 billion in the U.S. alone. 

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image: Ancient Protein Helps <em>E. coli</em> Thwart Viral Attack

Ancient Protein Helps E. coli Thwart Viral Attack

By | May 9, 2017

When engineered to use a four-billion-year-old version of the protein thioredoxin, the bacteria can stall bacteriophage replication, a new study shows.

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The 19th century biologist’s drawings, tainted by scandal, helped bolster, then later dismiss, his biogenetic law.

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Time-lapse imaging shows the immune cells transferring chemical signals during pigment pattern formation in developing zebrafish.

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image: Infographic: How the Zebrafish Got Its Stripes

Infographic: How the Zebrafish Got Its Stripes

By | May 1, 2017

Immune cells called macrophages shuttle cellular messages in the skin.

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The lungs of extremely premature lambs supported in a closed, sterile environment that enables fluid-based gas exchange grow and develop normally, researchers report.

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