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image: Viral Protein Boosts Muscle Mass in Male Mice

Viral Protein Boosts Muscle Mass in Male Mice

By | September 14, 2016

An endogenous retrovirus that supports placenta formation in females also helps male mice build muscle, according to a study.

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image: Zika Update

Zika Update

By | August 24, 2016

More locally acquired cases in Florida; fetal brain damage investigated

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image: TS Picks: May 5, 2016

TS Picks: May 5, 2016

By | May 5, 2016

Zika update edition

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image: Zika-Infected Monkeys in Brazil

Zika-Infected Monkeys in Brazil

By | April 28, 2016

The viral strain scientists isolated from two nonhuman primates is identical to the one circulating among humans.

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image: Tracking Zika’s Evolution

Tracking Zika’s Evolution

By | April 15, 2016

Sequence analysis of 41 viral strains reveals more than a half-century of change. 

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image: New Fish Virus Discovered

New Fish Virus Discovered

By | April 7, 2016

Researchers identify a virus that may already have caused mass tilapia die-offs in Ecuador and Israel in recent years.

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image: Zika Up Close

Zika Up Close

By | March 31, 2016

A detailed structure of the pathogen highlights its similarities to—and one major difference from—other flaviviruses. 

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image: Fecal Transplants Transmit Viruses, Too

Fecal Transplants Transmit Viruses, Too

By | March 29, 2016

Fecal matter transplants may transfer nonpathogenic viruses along with beneficial bacteria, scientists show.

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image: Zika Brought to Americas in 2013

Zika Brought to Americas in 2013

By | March 24, 2016

A new analysis places the virus’s arrival around one year earlier than previously estimated.

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image: New Test for Zika OKed

New Test for Zika OKed

By | March 22, 2016

The US Food and Drug Administration gave emergency approval for a combination diagnostic that can distinguish between Zika, dengue, and chikungunya infections.

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