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image: Out, Damned Mycoplasma!

Out, Damned Mycoplasma!

By | December 1, 2013

Pointers for keeping your cell cultures free of mycoplasma contamination

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image: Thomas Gregor: Biological Quantifier

Thomas Gregor: Biological Quantifier

By | November 1, 2013

Assistant Professor, Physics, Princeton University. Age: 39

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image: About Face

About Face

By | October 25, 2013

Researchers show that genetic enhancer elements likely contribute to face shape in mice.

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image: Lab Tubes Contaminated with Virus

Lab Tubes Contaminated with Virus

By | September 20, 2013

A novel virus thought to have come from human samples appears to have been derived from seawater during the manufacture of tubes used to extract DNA.  

4 Comments

image: Bacterial Quid Pro Quo

Bacterial Quid Pro Quo

By | August 19, 2013

Pseudomonas aeruginosa gather swarming speed at the expense of their ability to form biofilms in an experimental evolution setup.

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image: Stem Cells Open Up Options

Stem Cells Open Up Options

By | August 13, 2013

Pluripotent cells can help regenerate tissues and maintain long life—and they may also help animals jumpstart drastically new lifestyles.

17 Comments

image: Safe Flu Research Strategy

Safe Flu Research Strategy

By | August 12, 2013

Researchers develop a new “molecular biocontainment” strategy for safely studying deadly flu viruses.

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image: Moving Objects Using Sound

Moving Objects Using Sound

By | July 17, 2013

Levitating and manipulating objects using sound waves could help prevent contamination of materials.

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image: Doubts Surface About Antarctic Life

Doubts Surface About Antarctic Life

By | July 11, 2013

Researchers contend that contamination is behind recent suggestions that Antarctica’s largest subglacial lake harbors complex life such as crustaceans and fish.

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image: Antarctic Lake Teems With Life

Antarctic Lake Teems With Life

By | July 8, 2013

DNA and RNA sequences from Lake Vostok below the Antarctic glacier reveal thousands of bacteria species, including some commonly found in fish digestive systems.

1 Comment

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