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» autism spectrum disorder and evolution

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image: “King of Noses”

“King of Noses”

By | September 24, 2014

New hadrosaur uncovered in Utah hints at surprising speciation.  

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image: Squid-Inspired Electric Elastomer

Squid-Inspired Electric Elastomer

By | September 18, 2014

Polymer changes color and texture in response to remote signals. 

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image: Did <em>Spinosaurus </em> Swim?

Did Spinosaurus Swim?

By | September 15, 2014

Most complete skeleton suggests the dinosaurs were semi-aquatic hunters. 

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image: Prehistoric Critters Change View of Mammal Evolution

Prehistoric Critters Change View of Mammal Evolution

By | September 12, 2014

Three extinct squirrel-like species were identified from Jurassic-era fossils in China.

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image: Bird Diversity Drops From Forests to Farms

Bird Diversity Drops From Forests to Farms

By | September 11, 2014

Farms support less phylogenetically diverse bird populations than forests, but some farms are better than others.

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image: Pilot Study Treats Infants for Autism

Pilot Study Treats Infants for Autism

By | September 11, 2014

A preliminary trial finds that teaching parents certain therapeutic interactions for babies showing early signs of autism may improve the infants’ future social development.

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image: Genome Digest

Genome Digest

By | September 10, 2014

What researchers are learning as they sequence, map, and decode species’ genomes

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image: Behavior Brief

Behavior Brief

By | September 5, 2014

A round-up of recent discoveries in behavior research

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image: Humongous Herbivorous Dinosaur

Humongous Herbivorous Dinosaur

By | September 4, 2014

A near-complete titanosaur fossil provides new details of the dinosaurs’ lives. 

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image: Losing Languages

Losing Languages

By | September 4, 2014

Biological criteria and evolutionary models help predict threats to spoken language, according to two studies.

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