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image: Myriad, Post Mortem

Myriad, Post Mortem

By | June 1, 2016

David Schwartz of the Illinois Institute of Technology-Chicago, Kent College of Law, discusses the impact of the US Supreme Court unanimously striking down Myriad Genetics' patent of human BRCA genes and tests to detect mutations in them.

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image: Governing Science

Governing Science

By | December 31, 2013

How the US government impacted life science research in 2013

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image: Criminal Hype

Criminal Hype

By | September 25, 2013

Overstating the benefits of a drug lands a former biotech executive in home detention.

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image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | August 1, 2013

August 2013's selection of notable quotes

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image: Another Lawsuit over Genetic Tests

Another Lawsuit over Genetic Tests

By | July 11, 2013

Myriad Genetics, the company originally behind tests for the cancer-associated BRCA mutations, is suing two competitors for patent infringement.

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image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | July 1, 2013

July 2013's selection of notable quotes

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image: Gene Patents Decision: Everybody Wins

Gene Patents Decision: Everybody Wins

By | June 18, 2013

Last week’s Supreme Court decision to invalidate patents on human genes was a win for patients, independent researchers, and even the wider biotech industry.

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image: Opinion: On Patenting Genes

Opinion: On Patenting Genes

By | June 18, 2013

The scientific community and the impact of the Myriad Genetics Supreme Court decision

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image: Week in Review, June 10–14

Week in Review, June 10–14

By | June 14, 2013

Supreme Court says no patenting (natural) genes; brain-computer interfaces mimic motor learning in brain; regenerating finger tips; gene therapy goes deeper; NIH needs more diversity; cross-border collaboration

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image: Supreme Court Nixes Patenting Human Genes

Supreme Court Nixes Patenting Human Genes

By | June 13, 2013

The Justices have decided that isolated sequences of human DNA are not eligible for patent protection, but rules that artificial sequences can be patented.  

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