The Scientist

» gut microbiota

Most Recent

image: Transplanted Fecal Microbes Stick Around

Transplanted Fecal Microbes Stick Around

By | April 28, 2016

Donor bacteria coexist with a recipient’s own for three months after a fecal transplant.

2 Comments

image: Worm Infection Can Improve Gut Health: Study

Worm Infection Can Improve Gut Health: Study

By | April 14, 2016

Parasitic worms promote the growth of beneficial intestinal microbes in a mouse model of inflammatory bowel disease.

2 Comments

image: Immune Influence

Immune Influence

By | April 1, 2016

In recent years, research has demonstrated that microbes living in and on the mammalian body can affect cancer risk, as well as responses to cancer treatment.

0 Comments

image: Microbes Meet Cancer

Microbes Meet Cancer

By | April 1, 2016

Understanding cancer’s relationship with the human microbiome could transform immune-modulating therapies.

4 Comments

image: Fecal Transplants Transmit Viruses, Too

Fecal Transplants Transmit Viruses, Too

By | March 29, 2016

Fecal matter transplants may transfer nonpathogenic viruses along with beneficial bacteria, scientists show.

0 Comments

Researchers identify a molecule that protects antibiotic-treated mice from an opportunistic bacterial infection.

0 Comments

image: Breast Milk Sugars Support Infant Gut Health

Breast Milk Sugars Support Infant Gut Health

By | February 18, 2016

Oligosaccharides found in breast milk stimulate the activity of gut bacteria, promoting growth in two animal models of infant malnutrition.

0 Comments

image: Hibernation Helpers

Hibernation Helpers

By | February 8, 2016

Gut microbes may help regulate the metabolic changes a bear experiences before and during hibernation, scientists show.

0 Comments

image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | February 1, 2016

February 2016's selection of notable quotes

1 Comment

image: Gut Microbes Need Fiber, Too

Gut Microbes Need Fiber, Too

By | January 13, 2016

A low-fiber diet decimated the diversity of bacterial species in mice colonized with human gut microbes in a recent study.

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. How Plants Evolved Different Ways to Make Caffeine
  2. Thomson Reuters Predicts Nobelists
    The Nutshell Thomson Reuters Predicts Nobelists

    According to citation statistics, researchers behind programmed cell death pathways and CRISPR/Cas9 are among those in line for Nobel Prizes this year.

  3. Sequencing Reveals Genomic Diversity of the Human Brain
  4. Reviewing Results-Free Manuscripts
    The Nutshell Reviewing Results-Free Manuscripts

    An open-access journal is trialing a peer-review process in which reviewers do not have access to the results or discussion sections of submitted papers.

RayBiotech