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Thirty percent of bacteria found in babies' guts came from mothers' milk, a study finds.

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image: Warmer Temps Tied to Altered Microbiome in Lizards

Warmer Temps Tied to Altered Microbiome in Lizards

By | May 8, 2017

Bacterial differences after three-month temperature hikes, modeled after global warming predictions, were evident one year later, a study found.

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image: Future Homes May Have Bioreactive Walls

Future Homes May Have Bioreactive Walls

By | May 1, 2017

Researchers are redesigning the humble brick to produce electricity, to clean water and air, and to harvest valuable compounds.

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The giant lizards have numerous microbicidal compounds in their blood.

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image: EPA Scrubs Climate Change Page from Website

EPA Scrubs Climate Change Page from Website

By | April 30, 2017

The US Environmental Protection Agency removed information about global warming and greenhouse gas emissions that doesn’t jibe with the Trump administration’s views.

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A mouse study reveals a causal link between changes in intestinal microbiota and increasing inflammation as the rodents age.

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Aerial survey results reveal severe coral bleaching across much of the massive reef system.

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Mice exposed to low doses of penicillin in utero or as young pups exhibited long-term behavioral differences not seen in their non-exposed counterparts, according to a study.

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Recolonizing middle-aged animals with bacteria from younger ones kept killifish alive longer than usual, researchers report.

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image: In Certain Social Bees, Gut Microbiomes Follow Phylogeny

In Certain Social Bees, Gut Microbiomes Follow Phylogeny

By | March 29, 2017

Corbiculate bees and their gut-dwelling microbes have been coevolving since the social species evolved from their solitary ancestors around 80 million years ago, scientists suggest. 

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