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image: Arctic’s Menacing Melt

Arctic’s Menacing Melt

By | December 7, 2012

A new assessment reveals that the Arctic’s environment is rapidly deteriorating, threatening species and global weather patterns.

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The Scientist’s 2012 Geeky Gift Guide

By | December 6, 2012

Find the perfect present for the dedicated (or budding) scientists in your life

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image: Normal Fat Tissue Metabolism

Normal Fat Tissue Metabolism

By | December 6, 2012

Adipose tissue plays an immune role in individuals of normal wieght.

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Hand Signs for Science

By | December 5, 2012

Organizations are calling for a common set of sign language for scientific terms.

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image: Book Excerpt from Tibet Wild

Book Excerpt from Tibet Wild

By | December 1, 2012

In the introduction to his latest book, renowned naturalist George Schaller describes the evolving role of the field biologist through the lens of his experiences with Himalayan wildlife.

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Contributors

By | December 1, 2012

Meet some of the people featured in the December 2012 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Fat's Immune Sentinels

Fat's Immune Sentinels

By | December 1, 2012

Certain immune cells keep adipose tissue in check by helping to define normal and abnormal physiological states.

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In the Long Run

By | December 1, 2012

Can emulating our early human ancestors make us healthier?

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image: Playing the Field

Playing the Field

By | December 1, 2012

The role of field biologists is changing as conservation biology evolves and ecological challenges mount.

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Speaking of Science

By | December 1, 2012

December 2012's selection of notable quotes

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