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Research shows that human immunity develops much earlier than previously thought, but functions differently in adults.

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image: Warming to Blame for Coral Bleaching in Hawaii

Warming to Blame for Coral Bleaching in Hawaii

By | May 30, 2017

Nearly half of the corals in a nature preserve off Oahu bleached in recent years, according to a study.

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image: Antarctica Is Turning Green

Antarctica Is Turning Green

By | May 22, 2017

As the climate warms, moss growth dramatically spreads on the continent’s peninsula. 

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image: A Coral to Outlast Climate Change

A Coral to Outlast Climate Change

By | May 18, 2017

Stylophora pistillata, a reef coral in the Northern Red Sea, thrived in simulated global-warming conditions.

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image: Warmer Temps Tied to Altered Microbiome in Lizards

Warmer Temps Tied to Altered Microbiome in Lizards

By | May 8, 2017

Bacterial differences after three-month temperature hikes, modeled after global warming predictions, were evident one year later, a study found.

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The 19th century biologist’s drawings, tainted by scandal, helped bolster, then later dismiss, his biogenetic law.

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Time-lapse imaging shows the immune cells transferring chemical signals during pigment pattern formation in developing zebrafish.

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image: Infographic: How the Zebrafish Got Its Stripes

Infographic: How the Zebrafish Got Its Stripes

By | May 1, 2017

Immune cells called macrophages shuttle cellular messages in the skin.

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image: EPA Scrubs Climate Change Page from Website

EPA Scrubs Climate Change Page from Website

By | April 30, 2017

The US Environmental Protection Agency removed information about global warming and greenhouse gas emissions that doesn’t jibe with the Trump administration’s views.

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The lungs of extremely premature lambs supported in a closed, sterile environment that enables fluid-based gas exchange grow and develop normally, researchers report.

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