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image: All In Proportion

All In Proportion

By | March 2, 2013

Drosophila insulin-like peptides (dILPs) regulate part of the signaling pathway that helps keep organs growing in proportion during development.

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Contributors

By | March 1, 2013

Meet some of the people featured in the March 2013 issue of The Scientist.

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Speaking of Science

By | March 1, 2013

March 2013's selection of notable quotes

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Instant Messaging

By | March 1, 2013

During development, communication between organs determines their relative final size.

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image: Fellow Travelers

Fellow Travelers

By | February 1, 2013

Collective cell migration relies on a directional signal that comes from the moving cluster, rather than from external cues.

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image: Go Forth, Cells

Go Forth, Cells

By | February 1, 2013

Watch the cell transplant experiments in zebrafish that suggest certain embryonic cells rely on intrinsic directional cues for collective migration.

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image: Soot a Major Factor in Climate Change

Soot a Major Factor in Climate Change

By | January 17, 2013

The black smoky emission is nearly as important as carbon dioxide in driving global warming.

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image: Climate Change to Continue

Climate Change to Continue

By | January 15, 2013

A US federal advisory committee finds that climate change is already impacting the country, and that it’s not about to stop.

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image: 2012 Multimedia Roundup

2012 Multimedia Roundup

By | December 14, 2012

The science images and videos that captured our attention in 2012

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image: Opinion: Is America Ready to Listen?

Opinion: Is America Ready to Listen?

By , , and | December 12, 2012

In the wake of Hurricane Sandy, climate scientists should make their consensus about climate change known to all who care to listen.

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