The Scientist

» global warming and developmental biology

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image: Climate Change Man Made, Once Again

Climate Change Man Made, Once Again

By | December 6, 2011

A new climate model shows that anthropogenic greenhouse gases are by far the main cause of global warming.

3 Comments

image: Astronaut Worms Return from Space

Astronaut Worms Return from Space

By | December 1, 2011

After 6 months in orbit, Caenorhabditis elegans return to Earth—alive and well.

3 Comments

image: Eye of Newt

Eye of Newt

By | December 1, 2011

Researchers find that newts are capable of regenerating body parts well into old age.

3 Comments

image: Frank Bradke: Privy to Axon Growth

Frank Bradke: Privy to Axon Growth

By | December 1, 2011

Full Professor and Senior Research Group Leader, German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases. Age: 42

5 Comments

image: Newts' New Eyes

Newts' New Eyes

By | December 1, 2011

Cut off a newt’s tail or a leg, or remove a lens from its eye, and it grows back. However, whether newts can continue to do this throughout their lives, or lose the ability as they get older, has remained a mystery. 

3 Comments

image: Flow Cytometry for the Masses

Flow Cytometry for the Masses

By | December 1, 2011

Tagging antibodies with rare earth metals instead of fluorescent molecules turns a veteran technique into a high-throughput powerhouse.

3 Comments

image: Environmentally-Friendly Sheep?

Environmentally-Friendly Sheep?

By | November 13, 2011

A new model of sheep farming shows that genetic changes can help lower methane production, leading to lower greenhouse gas emission.

0 Comments

image: Climate Change Not Exaggerated

Climate Change Not Exaggerated

By | October 21, 2011

A study funded by climate change skeptics confirms that global warming is happening at the rate questioned by "Climategate."

42 Comments

image: Behavior Brief

Behavior Brief

By | October 17, 2011

A round-up of recent discoveries in behavior research

3 Comments

image: Beyond Nature vs. Nurture

Beyond Nature vs. Nurture

By | October 1, 2011

Researchers studying differences in how individuals respond to stress are finding that genes are malleable and environments can be deterministic.

12 Comments

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