The Scientist

» global warming, ecology and immunology

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image: Marlboro Chicks

Marlboro Chicks

By | December 5, 2012

Two species of songbirds pack their nests with scavenged cigarette butts that repel irksome parasites.

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image: Contributors


By | December 1, 2012

Meet some of the people featured in the December 2012 issue of The Scientist.


image: Fat's Immune Sentinels

Fat's Immune Sentinels

By | December 1, 2012

Certain immune cells keep adipose tissue in check by helping to define normal and abnormal physiological states.


image: In the Long Run

In the Long Run

By | December 1, 2012

Can emulating our early human ancestors make us healthier?

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Speaking of Science

By | December 1, 2012

December 2012's selection of notable quotes


image: Coughing Seashells

Coughing Seashells

By | November 28, 2012

A type of scallop expels water and waste through a sort of cough that could reveal clues about water quality.

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image: Can Worms Alleviate Autism?

Can Worms Alleviate Autism?

By | November 27, 2012

Autism researchers are testing the ability of whipworm eggs to treat autism in a new clinical trial.


image: Beetles Warm BC Forests

Beetles Warm BC Forests

By | November 27, 2012

Using satellite data, researchers calculate that mountain pine beetle infestations raise summertime temperatures in British Columbia’s pine forests by 1 degree Celsius.


image: Record High for Greenhouse Gases

Record High for Greenhouse Gases

By | November 21, 2012

The World Meteorological Organization finds that the atmospheric gases behind climate change reached a new record high in 2011.

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image: Old New Species

Old New Species

By | November 20, 2012

Decades can pass between the discovery of a new animal or plant and its official debut in the scientific literature.


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