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» retraction, microbiology and disease/medicine

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image: To Each His Own

To Each His Own

By | April 1, 2015

Cancer treatment becomes more and more personal.

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image: My Mighty Mouse

My Mighty Mouse

By | April 1, 2015

Personal drug regimens based on xenograft mice harboring a single patient’s tumor still need to prove their true utility in medicine.

1 Comment

image: Resisting Cancer

Resisting Cancer

By | April 1, 2015

If one out of three people develops cancer, that means two others don’t. Understanding why could lead to insights relevant to prevention and treatment.

7 Comments

image: Mass Retraction

Mass Retraction

By | March 27, 2015

BioMed Central retracts 43 papers it had been investigating for evidence of faked peer review.

0 Comments

image: Ebola Vax Trial Update

Ebola Vax Trial Update

By | March 26, 2015

A novel Ebola vaccine being tested in China is safe and provokes a notable immune response in people, according to a Phase 1 trial.

0 Comments

image: Soil Bacteria Live on Wine Grapes

Soil Bacteria Live on Wine Grapes

By | March 25, 2015

The earthiness of Merlot may have to do with grapevine-dwelling microbiota.

2 Comments

image: Short, Strong Signals

Short, Strong Signals

By | March 25, 2015

Methylation increases both the activity and instability of the signaling protein Notch.

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image: Quorum-Sensing Molecule Modifies Gut Microbiota

Quorum-Sensing Molecule Modifies Gut Microbiota

By | March 19, 2015

Increasing the abundance of a chemical some microbes use to communicate with one another can help reinstate beneficial bacterial populations in the guts of antibiotic-treated mice. 

1 Comment

image: Three Retractions for Highly Cited Author

Three Retractions for Highly Cited Author

By | March 19, 2015

Robert Weinberg’s team at MIT is pulling three papers, noting some figure panels were composites of different experiments.

4 Comments

image: T Cells of the Skin

T Cells of the Skin

By | March 18, 2015

A census of adaptive immune system components in human skin reveals a variety of resident and traveling memory T cells.

1 Comment

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