The Scientist

» retraction, microbiology and disease/medicine

Most Recent

image: Branching Out

Branching Out

By | April 11, 2016

Researchers create a new tree of life, largely composed of mystery bacteria.

0 Comments

image: Retracted Study’s Strategy Resurrected

Retracted Study’s Strategy Resurrected

By | April 11, 2016

Researchers replicate the methods used in a falsified 2014 study that claimed short, in-person conversations could sway attitudes on same-sex marriage, this time reporting that the technique worked on people initially opposed to transgender rights.

0 Comments

image: Zooming In on an Antidepressant Target

Zooming In on an Antidepressant Target

By | April 6, 2016

Structural studies reveal how SSRI drugs bind to the human serotonin transporter.

0 Comments

image: Contributors

Contributors

By | April 1, 2016

Meet some of the people featured in the April 2016 issue of The Scientist.

0 Comments

image: Pulling It All Together

Pulling It All Together

By | April 1, 2016

Systems-biology approaches offer new strategies for finding hard-to-identify drug targets for cancer.

0 Comments

image: Shooting for the Moon

Shooting for the Moon

By | April 1, 2016

Defeating cancer is many times more difficult than planting a flag on our lunar satellite.

4 Comments

image: Immune Influence

Immune Influence

By | April 1, 2016

In recent years, research has demonstrated that microbes living in and on the mammalian body can affect cancer risk, as well as responses to cancer treatment.

0 Comments

image: Microbes Meet Cancer

Microbes Meet Cancer

By | April 1, 2016

Understanding cancer’s relationship with the human microbiome could transform immune-modulating therapies.

4 Comments

image: Startup Licenses “Vaginal Seeding” Approach

Startup Licenses “Vaginal Seeding” Approach

By | March 31, 2016

Boston-based Commense plans to develop microbial and nonmicrobial interventions aimed at improving child health.

0 Comments

image: Contacts May Affect Eye Microbiome

Contacts May Affect Eye Microbiome

By | March 23, 2016

The bacterial communities in the eyes of contact lens wearers resemble those of the skin, according to a study. 

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Thomson Reuters Predicts Nobelists
    The Nutshell Thomson Reuters Predicts Nobelists

    According to citation statistics, researchers behind programmed cell death pathways and CRISPR/Cas9 are among those in line for Nobel Prizes this year.

  2. Sequencing Reveals Genomic Diversity of the Human Brain
  3. How Plants Evolved Different Ways to Make Caffeine
  4. What Sensory Receptors Do Outside of Sense Organs
RayBiotech