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image: Call for STAP Retractions

Call for STAP Retractions

By | March 11, 2014

One of the scientists behind the stimulus-triggered acquisition of pluripotency studies, which independent groups have had trouble reproducing, has requested that the papers be pulled from the literature.

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image: Week in Review: March 3–7

Week in Review: March 3–7

By | March 7, 2014

The gene behind a butterfly’s mimicry; the evolution of adipose fins; bacteria and bowel cancer; plants lacking plastid genomes

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image: Bacteria’s Role in Bowel Cancer

Bacteria’s Role in Bowel Cancer

By | March 3, 2014

The development of serrated polyps depends on bacteria present in the gut, a mouse study shows.  

3 Comments

image: Early Evidence

Early Evidence

By | March 1, 2014

Fossilized structures suggest that mat-forming microbes have been around for almost 3.5 billion years.

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image: A Wine Bacterium’s Proteome

A Wine Bacterium’s Proteome

By | February 26, 2014

Scientists map the partial proteome of a common lactic acid bacterium.

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image: How a Microbe Resists Its Own Antibiotics

How a Microbe Resists Its Own Antibiotics

By | February 20, 2014

Researchers reveal the molecular mechanisms of Streptomyces platensis’s defense from its own antibiotics, which inhibit fatty acid synthesis in other microbes.

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image: Teaching Moments

Teaching Moments

By | February 19, 2014

Professors at Clayton State University in Morrow, Georgia, are using retracted studies to teach biology and chemistry students about the process of science.

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image: More Retractions for Fallen Scientist

More Retractions for Fallen Scientist

By | February 7, 2014

Molecular and Cellular Biology pulls five papers from endocrinologist Shigeaki Kato.

1 Comment

image: Microbial Smog

Microbial Smog

By | February 3, 2014

Some 1,300 species of microbes, including some associated with allergies and lung disease, are adrift in Beijing’s thick smog.

4 Comments

image: Self-Improvement Through the Ages

Self-Improvement Through the Ages

By | February 1, 2014

A 50,000-generation-long experiment shows that bacteria keep getting fitter.

2 Comments

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