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image: Bear Study Breaks Down

Bear Study Breaks Down

By | September 2, 2015

Authors retract a paper on grizzlies’ metabolism after finding one person made up data.

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image: Adapting to Elevated CO<sub>2</sub>

Adapting to Elevated CO2

By | September 1, 2015

High carbon dioxide levels can irreversibly rev up a cyanobacterium’s ability to fix nitrogen over the long term, a study finds.

2 Comments

image: The Great Big Clean-Up

The Great Big Clean-Up

By | September 1, 2015

From tossing out cross-contaminated cell lines to flagging genomic misnomers, a push is on to tidy up biomedical research.

5 Comments

image: Microorganisms Make a House a Home?

Microorganisms Make a House a Home?

By | August 26, 2015

The fungal and bacterial communities in household dust can reveal some details about a building’s inhabitants.

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image: Bacteria to Blame?

Bacteria to Blame?

By | August 18, 2015

T cells activated in the microbe-dense gut can spark an autoimmune eye disease, a study shows. 

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image: Another Mass Retraction

Another Mass Retraction

By | August 17, 2015

Springer is pulling 64 papers from 10 of its journals because of “fabricated peer-review reports.”

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image: Two Papers Pulled for Figure Fraud

Two Papers Pulled for Figure Fraud

By | August 17, 2015

A University of Florida investigation has found the lead author on both studies faked data on stress response in Caenorhabditis elegans.

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image: BMC Revises Retraction

BMC Revises Retraction

By | August 13, 2015

BioMed Central updates a retraction notice issued in March after finding out the authors did not influence the peer-review process.

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image: The Search for Persisters

The Search for Persisters

By | August 11, 2015

Lyme disease–causing bacteria can outmaneuver antibiotics in vitro and manipulate the mouse immune system.

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image: Subway Microbiome Study Revised

Subway Microbiome Study Revised

By | August 4, 2015

Researchers tone down their highly publicized study that reported the presence of deadly pathogens on New York City subways.

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