The Scientist

» retraction and neuroscience

Most Recent

image: Remote Mind Control

Remote Mind Control

By | November 1, 2015

Using chemogenetic tools to spur the brain into action

0 Comments

image: Another Retraction for Fake Nutrition Data

Another Retraction for Fake Nutrition Data

By | October 29, 2015

The BMJ yanks a study on baby formula from R.K. Chandra decades after it was published.

2 Comments

image: Latest in Heart Stem Cell Debate

Latest in Heart Stem Cell Debate

By | October 26, 2015

Given the right environment, cKit+ cells from the mouse heart can develop into new cardiac muscle, according to a study.

0 Comments

image: Rewarding Companions

Rewarding Companions

By | October 26, 2015

Oxytocin and social contact together modulate endocannabinoid activity in the mouse brain, which could help explain the prosocial effects of marijuana use. 

0 Comments

image: Parsing Negative Citations

Parsing Negative Citations

By | October 26, 2015

A new tool helps scientists better understand what happens to studies that are criticized in the literature.

0 Comments

image: Electrode-Free Electrophysiology

Electrode-Free Electrophysiology

By | October 22, 2015

Optogenetics has evolved beyond its neuron-stimulating capacities to an all-optical approach for both manipulating and recording cells.

0 Comments

image: Speaking of Neuroscience

Speaking of Neuroscience

By | October 22, 2015

A selection of notable quotes from the Society for Neuroscience meeting

0 Comments

image: New Hope for Alzheimer’s Blood Test

New Hope for Alzheimer’s Blood Test

By | October 19, 2015

Using autoantibodies as biomarkers, researchers could soon identify people at the highest risk of developing neurodegenerative diseases much earlier than existing methods.

0 Comments

image: Cognitive Neuroscience Lurking in Art

Cognitive Neuroscience Lurking in Art

By | October 19, 2015

What can neuroscientists learn from the masters and other artists?

0 Comments

image: Newfound Neurons

Newfound Neurons

By | October 19, 2015

Researchers identify a new type of brain cell in male Caenorhabditis elegans.

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Running on Empty
    Features Running on Empty

    Regularly taking breaks from eating—for hours or days—can trigger changes both expected, such as in metabolic dynamics and inflammation, and surprising, as in immune system function and cancer progression.

  2. Athletes’ Microbiomes Differ from Nonathletes
  3. Gut Feeling
    Daily News Gut Feeling

    Sensory cells of the mouse intestine let the brain know if certain compounds are present by speaking directly to gut neurons via serotonin.

  4. Immune Cells Deliver Cancer Drugs to the Brain
AAAS