The Scientist

» retraction and cell & molecular biology

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image: Holding Their Ground

Holding Their Ground

By | February 1, 2016

To protect the global food supply, scientists want to understand—and enhance—plants’ natural resistance to pathogens.

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image: Plant Immunity

Plant Immunity

By | February 1, 2016

How plants fight off pathogens

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image: Schizophrenia and the Synapse

Schizophrenia and the Synapse

By | January 27, 2016

Genetic evidence suggests that overactive synaptic pruning drives development of schizophrenia.

5 Comments

image: Funding Ban for Plant Biologist

Funding Ban for Plant Biologist

By | January 26, 2016

Olivier Voinnet, who has corrected and retracted several papers, cannot receive Swiss government grants for three years.

1 Comment

image: Another Role for ApoE?

Another Role for ApoE?

By | January 20, 2016

Key Alzheimer’s disease–related protein may be a transcriptional regulator.

3 Comments

image: GM Paper Flagged by Politician Retracted

GM Paper Flagged by Politician Retracted

By | January 18, 2016

One of three suspect publications from a group of scientists in Italy is pulled for plagiarism while an investigation is ongoing.

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image: Expected Retraction Published

Expected Retraction Published

By | January 13, 2016

The repeal of a Molecular Endocrinology paper is the second of three anticipated retractions from a cell biologist.

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image: How Multicellularity Arose

How Multicellularity Arose

By | January 11, 2016

Researchers identify a molecule that may have been key to the surprisingly common transition from single-celled ancestors to today’s complex, multicellular organisms. 

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image: Fraudulent Paper Pulled

Fraudulent Paper Pulled

By | January 5, 2016

Nature retracts a study six years after an investigation found that the protein structures it reported were fabricated.

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image: Molecular Fingerprint Predicts Flu Shot Response

Molecular Fingerprint Predicts Flu Shot Response

By | January 4, 2016

A gene-expression signature correlates with a person’s likelihood of experiencing adverse events after receiving a seasonal flu vaccine, scientists show. 

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