Advertisement
Cellular Research
Cellular Research

The Scientist

» retraction and developmental biology

Most Recent

image: Go Forth, Cells

Go Forth, Cells

By | February 1, 2013

Watch the cell transplant experiments in zebrafish that suggest certain embryonic cells rely on intrinsic directional cues for collective migration.

0 Comments

image: Review Retracted for Plagiarism

Review Retracted for Plagiarism

By | January 29, 2013

The authors of a review article on genome-wide association studies have retracted the paper due to “substantial textual overlap” with other sources.

1 Comment

image: Cancer Biomarker Studies Retracted

Cancer Biomarker Studies Retracted

By | January 3, 2013

Researchers from Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine have retracted two papers involving colon cancer biomarkers.

0 Comments

image: Festive Fraud

Festive Fraud

By | January 2, 2013

Two biomedical researchers have been found guilty of falsifying data.

2 Comments

image: Expensive Retraction

Expensive Retraction

By | January 2, 2013

A publisher bills authors $650 to retract a twice-published paper.

2 Comments

image: Top Science Scandals of 2012

Top Science Scandals of 2012

By | December 17, 2012

This year’s roundup of bad behavior in the life sciences and new initiatives to prevent misconduct

20 Comments

image: 2012 Multimedia Roundup

2012 Multimedia Roundup

By | December 14, 2012

The science images and videos that captured our attention in 2012

1 Comment

image: Do Innocent Errors Cause Most Retractions?

Do Innocent Errors Cause Most Retractions?

By | November 2, 2012

Contrary to previous studies, a new publication finds that most retractions from scholarly literature are not due to misconduct.  

3 Comments

image: Retraction Backlash

Retraction Backlash

By | November 1, 2012

Retracting a paper from the scientific literature can lead to fewer citations for related studies.  

0 Comments

image: Coming to Terms

Coming to Terms

By | November 1, 2012

New noninvasive methods of selecting the most viable embryo could revolutionize in vitro fertilization.

11 Comments

Advertisement

Popular Now

  1. Opinion: Making Progress by Slowing Down
  2. How Fats Influence the Microbiome
  3. Censored Professor Quits
    The Nutshell Censored Professor Quits

    Alice Dreger is resigning from the faculty of Northwestern University, claiming that the administration censored her work in a faculty journal.

  4. Influential Cancer Biologist Dies
Advertisement
Advertisement
Life Technologies