Advertisement
NorthEastern
NorthEastern

The Scientist

» retraction and developmental biology

Most Recent

image: Fraudulent Paper Pulled

Fraudulent Paper Pulled

By | January 5, 2016

Nature retracts a study six years after an investigation found that the protein structures it reported were fabricated.

0 Comments

image: Papers Pulled for Image Manipulation

Papers Pulled for Image Manipulation

By | December 30, 2015

Scientists retract two studies from the Journal of Virology, citing another case of an author tinkering with figures.

0 Comments

image: The Top 10 Retractions of 2015

The Top 10 Retractions of 2015

By | December 23, 2015

A look at this year’s most memorable retractions

2 Comments

image: Week in Review: November 30–December 4

Week in Review: November 30–December 4

By | December 4, 2015

Historic meeting on human gene editing; signs of obesity found in sperm epigenome; top 10 innovations of 2015; dealing with retractions

0 Comments

image: Self Correction

Self Correction

By | December 1, 2015

What to do when you realize your publication is fatally flawed

0 Comments

image: The Cyclopes of Idaho, 1950s

The Cyclopes of Idaho, 1950s

By | December 1, 2015

A rash of deformed lambs eventually led to the creation of a cancer-fighting agent.

0 Comments

image: Blood Cell Development Reimagined

Blood Cell Development Reimagined

By | November 9, 2015

A new study is rewriting 50 years of biological dogma by suggesting that mature blood cells develop much more rapidly from stem cells than previously thought.

0 Comments

image: Adding Padding

Adding Padding

By | November 1, 2015

Adipogenesis in mice has alternating genetic requirements throughout the animals’ lives.

0 Comments

image: Another Retraction for Fake Nutrition Data

Another Retraction for Fake Nutrition Data

By | October 29, 2015

The BMJ yanks a study on baby formula from R.K. Chandra decades after it was published.

2 Comments

image: Latest in Heart Stem Cell Debate

Latest in Heart Stem Cell Debate

By | October 26, 2015

Given the right environment, cKit+ cells from the mouse heart can develop into new cardiac muscle, according to a study.

0 Comments

Advertisement
QIAGEN ingenuity
QIAGEN ingenuity

Popular Now

  1. First Data from Anti-Aging Gene Therapy
  2. The Two Faces of Fish Oil
    Notebook The Two Faces of Fish Oil

    The discovery of a tumor-protecting role for a fatty acid found in fish oil has sparked debate about the product’s safety.

  3. Brain Keeps Watch During Sleep
  4. Locating Language within the Brain
Advertisement
SomaLogic
SomaLogic
Advertisement
LabX
LabX