The Scientist

» retraction and developmental biology

Most Recent

image: Self Correction

Self Correction

By | December 1, 2015

What to do when you realize your publication is fatally flawed

0 Comments

image: The Cyclopes of Idaho, 1950s

The Cyclopes of Idaho, 1950s

By | December 1, 2015

A rash of deformed lambs eventually led to the creation of a cancer-fighting agent.

0 Comments

image: Blood Cell Development Reimagined

Blood Cell Development Reimagined

By | November 9, 2015

A new study is rewriting 50 years of biological dogma by suggesting that mature blood cells develop much more rapidly from stem cells than previously thought.

0 Comments

image: Adding Padding

Adding Padding

By | November 1, 2015

Adipogenesis in mice has alternating genetic requirements throughout the animals’ lives.

0 Comments

image: Another Retraction for Fake Nutrition Data

Another Retraction for Fake Nutrition Data

By | October 29, 2015

The BMJ yanks a study on baby formula from R.K. Chandra decades after it was published.

2 Comments

image: Latest in Heart Stem Cell Debate

Latest in Heart Stem Cell Debate

By | October 26, 2015

Given the right environment, cKit+ cells from the mouse heart can develop into new cardiac muscle, according to a study.

0 Comments

image: Parsing Negative Citations

Parsing Negative Citations

By | October 26, 2015

A new tool helps scientists better understand what happens to studies that are criticized in the literature.

0 Comments

image: Stem Cell Therapy In Utero

Stem Cell Therapy In Utero

By | October 13, 2015

An upcoming clinical trial aims to correct for a disease of fragile bones in affected babies before they are born.

0 Comments

image: More Peer Review Manipulation

More Peer Review Manipulation

By | October 13, 2015

Elsevier retracts nine papers from five of its journals after discovering made-up reviewer email addresses.

2 Comments

image: Gut Bacteria Linked to Asthma Risk

Gut Bacteria Linked to Asthma Risk

By | October 1, 2015

Four types of gut bacteria found in babies’ stool may help researchers predict the future development of asthma.

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Exercise Boosts Telomere Transcription
  2. Classic Example of Symbiosis Revised
  3. The Genetic Components of Rare Diseases
  4. Orangutan Imitates Human Speech
RayBiotech