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image: The Top 10 Retractions of 2015

The Top 10 Retractions of 2015

By | December 23, 2015

A look at this year’s most memorable retractions

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image: Week in Review: November 30–December 4

Week in Review: November 30–December 4

By | December 4, 2015

Historic meeting on human gene editing; signs of obesity found in sperm epigenome; top 10 innovations of 2015; dealing with retractions

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image: Self Correction

Self Correction

By | December 1, 2015

What to do when you realize your publication is fatally flawed

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image: The Cyclopes of Idaho, 1950s

The Cyclopes of Idaho, 1950s

By | December 1, 2015

A rash of deformed lambs eventually led to the creation of a cancer-fighting agent.

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image: Blood Cell Development Reimagined

Blood Cell Development Reimagined

By | November 9, 2015

A new study is rewriting 50 years of biological dogma by suggesting that mature blood cells develop much more rapidly from stem cells than previously thought.

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image: Adding Padding

Adding Padding

By | November 1, 2015

Adipogenesis in mice has alternating genetic requirements throughout the animals’ lives.

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image: Another Retraction for Fake Nutrition Data

Another Retraction for Fake Nutrition Data

By | October 29, 2015

The BMJ yanks a study on baby formula from R.K. Chandra decades after it was published.

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image: Latest in Heart Stem Cell Debate

Latest in Heart Stem Cell Debate

By | October 26, 2015

Given the right environment, cKit+ cells from the mouse heart can develop into new cardiac muscle, according to a study.

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image: Parsing Negative Citations

Parsing Negative Citations

By | October 26, 2015

A new tool helps scientists better understand what happens to studies that are criticized in the literature.

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image: Stem Cell Therapy In Utero

Stem Cell Therapy In Utero

By | October 13, 2015

An upcoming clinical trial aims to correct for a disease of fragile bones in affected babies before they are born.

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