The Scientist

» retraction and developmental biology

Most Recent

image: More Peer Review Manipulation

More Peer Review Manipulation

By | October 13, 2015

Elsevier retracts nine papers from five of its journals after discovering made-up reviewer email addresses.

2 Comments

image: Gut Bacteria Linked to Asthma Risk

Gut Bacteria Linked to Asthma Risk

By | October 1, 2015

Four types of gut bacteria found in babies’ stool may help researchers predict the future development of asthma.

0 Comments

image: Sex on the Brain

Sex on the Brain

By | October 1, 2015

Masculinization of the developing rodent brain leads to significant structural differences between the two sexes.

1 Comment

image: Sex Differences in the Brain

Sex Differences in the Brain

By | October 1, 2015

How male and female brains diverge is a hotly debated topic, but the study of model organisms points to differences that cannot be ignored.

27 Comments

image: Closing the Case on STAP?

Closing the Case on STAP?

By | September 23, 2015

Several reports offer an inside look into the stem-cell research controversy.

0 Comments

image: Alleged Scoop Sours Magnetoreceptor Collaboration

Alleged Scoop Sours Magnetoreceptor Collaboration

By | September 21, 2015

University administrators request a retraction upon learning that one researcher scooped another’s results despite having agreed not to.

1 Comment

image: Bear Study Breaks Down

Bear Study Breaks Down

By | September 2, 2015

Authors retract a paper on grizzlies’ metabolism after finding one person made up data.

1 Comment

image: Whaling Specimens, 1930s

Whaling Specimens, 1930s

By | September 1, 2015

Fetal specimens collected by commercial whalers offer insights into how whales may have evolved their specialized hearing organs.

0 Comments

image: Q&A: Placental Ponderings

Q&A: Placental Ponderings

By | August 27, 2015

Biologist Christopher Coe answers readers’ questions about the prescient organ.

0 Comments

image: Another Mass Retraction

Another Mass Retraction

By | August 17, 2015

Springer is pulling 64 papers from 10 of its journals because of “fabricated peer-review reports.”

2 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Running on Empty
    Features Running on Empty

    Regularly taking breaks from eating—for hours or days—can trigger changes both expected, such as in metabolic dynamics and inflammation, and surprising, as in immune system function and cancer progression.

  2. Gut Feeling
    Daily News Gut Feeling

    Sensory cells of the mouse intestine let the brain know if certain compounds are present by speaking directly to gut neurons via serotonin.

  3. Government Nixes Teaching Evolution in Turkish Schools
  4. Athletes’ Microbiomes Differ from Nonathletes
AAAS