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» retraction and developmental biology

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image: Mass Retraction

Mass Retraction

By | March 27, 2015

BioMed Central retracts 43 papers it had been investigating for evidence of faked peer review.

1 Comment

image: Short, Strong Signals

Short, Strong Signals

By | March 25, 2015

Methylation increases both the activity and instability of the signaling protein Notch.


image: Three Retractions for Highly Cited Author

Three Retractions for Highly Cited Author

By | March 19, 2015

Robert Weinberg’s team at MIT is pulling three papers, noting some figure panels were composites of different experiments.


image: Author Sues Journal

Author Sues Journal

By | February 10, 2015

The American Diabetes Association faces a lawsuit after journal editors express concern over several papers.


image: Opinion: Debunking Junk

Opinion: Debunking Junk

By | February 9, 2015

With more and more bad science infiltrating the media landscape, it’s time for researchers to speak up.


image: Fertility Treatment Fallout

Fertility Treatment Fallout

By | January 1, 2015

Mouse offspring conceived by in vitro fertilization are metabolically different from naturally conceived mice.


image: Journalists to Catalog Retractions

Journalists to Catalog Retractions

By | December 16, 2014

Staff of the blog Retraction Watch will create a database of papers retracted from the scientific literature.

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image: NIH Study Canceled

NIH Study Canceled

By | December 15, 2014

The National Institutes of Health shutters its initiative to track the health of 100,000 children through adulthood.


image: Mother’s Microbes Protect Baby’s Brain

Mother’s Microbes Protect Baby’s Brain

By | November 19, 2014

Bacteria in the gut of a pregnant mouse strengthen the blood-brain barrier of her developing fetus.


image: Stems Cells Ushered into Embryonic Development

Stems Cells Ushered into Embryonic Development

By | November 7, 2014

The right mix of mouse embryonic stem cells in a dish will start forming early embryonic patterns, according to two studies.


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