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image: Tumors Fall to Radioactive Bacteria

Tumors Fall to Radioactive Bacteria

By | April 22, 2013

Researchers use bacteria to deliver radiation to shrink pancreatic tumors in mice.

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image: Decade-Long Misconduct Case Closed

Decade-Long Misconduct Case Closed

By | April 9, 2013

A former University of Washington researcher did commit misconduct 10 years ago, according to the Office of Research Integrity.

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image: “Breathprints” Could Diagnose Disease

“Breathprints” Could Diagnose Disease

By | April 5, 2013

Researchers can identify individuals by the unique chemical signatures in their breath, suggesting that exhalations could be used for metabolomic tests.

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image: Week in Review: April 1-5

Week in Review: April 1-5

By | April 5, 2013

Living fossils not so fossilized; Canadian gov’t threatens scientists’ freedom to speak and publish; gene therapy for sensory disorders; an unusual theory of cancer; clues for an HIV vaccine

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image: Cancer Growth Curtailed

Cancer Growth Curtailed

By | April 4, 2013

Researchers develop two small molecules that slow the growth of human cancer cells.

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image: Roadmap to an HIV Vaccine

Roadmap to an HIV Vaccine

By | April 3, 2013

Researchers track the evolution of HIV in a single patient to understand what drives the production of broadly neutralizing antibodies.

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image: Novartis Linked to Retracted Papers?

Novartis Linked to Retracted Papers?

By | April 2, 2013

A Japanese newspaper claims that the pharma giant funded flawed research that revealed extra health benefits for one of its top-selling drugs.

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image: Cancer Clinical Trials of Tomorrow

Cancer Clinical Trials of Tomorrow

By | April 1, 2013

Advances in genomics and cancer biology will alter the design of human cancer studies.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | April 1, 2013

Meet some of the people featured in the April 2013 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Making Cancer More Transparent

Making Cancer More Transparent

By | April 1, 2013

A decade into the age of genomics, science is generating a flood of data that will help in the quest to eradicate the disease.

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