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» retraction, ecology and developmental biology

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image: Stem Cell Therapy In Utero

Stem Cell Therapy In Utero

By | October 13, 2015

An upcoming clinical trial aims to correct for a disease of fragile bones in affected babies before they are born.

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image: More Peer Review Manipulation

More Peer Review Manipulation

By | October 13, 2015

Elsevier retracts nine papers from five of its journals after discovering made-up reviewer email addresses.

2 Comments

image: One-Third of Cactus Species Threatened

One-Third of Cactus Species Threatened

By | October 6, 2015

A global assessment of declining cacti populations places responsibility on increasing human activities.

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image: Gut Bacteria Linked to Asthma Risk

Gut Bacteria Linked to Asthma Risk

By | October 1, 2015

Four types of gut bacteria found in babies’ stool may help researchers predict the future development of asthma.

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image: Sex on the Brain

Sex on the Brain

By | October 1, 2015

Masculinization of the developing rodent brain leads to significant structural differences between the two sexes.

1 Comment

image: Sex Differences in the Brain

Sex Differences in the Brain

By | October 1, 2015

How male and female brains diverge is a hotly debated topic, but the study of model organisms points to differences that cannot be ignored.

27 Comments

image: Closing the Case on STAP?

Closing the Case on STAP?

By | September 23, 2015

Several reports offer an inside look into the stem-cell research controversy.

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image: Alleged Scoop Sours Magnetoreceptor Collaboration

Alleged Scoop Sours Magnetoreceptor Collaboration

By | September 21, 2015

University administrators request a retraction upon learning that one researcher scooped another’s results despite having agreed not to.

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image: Bear Study Breaks Down

Bear Study Breaks Down

By | September 2, 2015

Authors retract a paper on grizzlies’ metabolism after finding one person made up data.

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image: Whaling Specimens, 1930s

Whaling Specimens, 1930s

By | September 1, 2015

Fetal specimens collected by commercial whalers offer insights into how whales may have evolved their specialized hearing organs.

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