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image: Hairy Situation for Wolves

Hairy Situation for Wolves

By | November 16, 2014

Researchers find high stress hormone levels in the hair of hunted wolves in Northern Canada.

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image: Butterfly Eyespots Deflect Predation

Butterfly Eyespots Deflect Predation

By | November 12, 2014

Researchers show that patterned coloration can be an effective means of distracting predators from vital body parts.

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image: Virus Decimating Spanish Amphibians

Virus Decimating Spanish Amphibians

By | October 20, 2014

Several toad, newt, and salamander populations are being hit hard by an emerging pathogen in a pristine national park in Spain.

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image: Week in Review: October 13–17

Week in Review: October 13–17

By | October 17, 2014

Snail not extinct after all; results too good to be true?; mice need myelin production for motor learning; keeping the brain young; the evolution of archaea

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | October 1, 2014

Meet some of the people featured in the October 2014 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Researchers Update STAP Protocol

Researchers Update STAP Protocol

By | September 15, 2014

Two coauthors on the now-retracted stimulus-triggered acquisition of pluripotency studies present yet another revision to the published method.

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image: Bird Diversity Drops From Forests to Farms

Bird Diversity Drops From Forests to Farms

By | September 11, 2014

Farms support less phylogenetically diverse bird populations than forests, but some farms are better than others.

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image: Peer Review of STAP Work Revealed

Peer Review of STAP Work Revealed

By | September 11, 2014

Early versions of two now-retracted stimulus-triggered acquisition of pluripotency studies had been rejected before.  

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image: Brain Genetics Paper Retracted

Brain Genetics Paper Retracted

By | September 4, 2014

A study that identified genes linked to communication between different areas of the brain has been retracted by its authors because of statistical flaws. 

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image: Six-Legged Syringes

Six-Legged Syringes

By | September 1, 2014

Researchers whose work requires that they draw blood from wild animals are finding unlikely collaborators in biting insects.

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