The Scientist

» retraction and ecology

Most Recent

image: This Bug Sucks

This Bug Sucks

By | September 1, 2014

An assassin bug, which some researchers are using as living syringes to sample blood from birds and mammals, feeds on a bat.

2 Comments

image: Splitting Hairs

Splitting Hairs

By | September 1, 2014

Fragments of mitochondrial DNA from deer hair found on the clothing of an ice-entombed mummy offer a glimpse into Copper Age ecology.

0 Comments

image: Beyond the Blueprint

Beyond the Blueprint

By , , and | September 1, 2014

In addition to serving as a set of instructions to build an individual, the genome can influence neighboring organisms and, potentially, entire ecosystems.

8 Comments

image: Subglacial Ecosystem

Subglacial Ecosystem

By | August 22, 2014

Samples from an Antarctic lake 800 meters below the ice reveal an abundance of microbial life.

0 Comments

image: The Price Tag of Scientific Fraud

The Price Tag of Scientific Fraud

By | August 15, 2014

Each paper retracted because of research misconduct costs taxpayers roughly $400,000, according to a report.

2 Comments

image: Highly Cited Stem Cell Paper Pulled

Highly Cited Stem Cell Paper Pulled

By | August 5, 2014

The authors of a 2008 Nature paper have retracted it after new data watered down the conclusions.

0 Comments

image: Narcolepsy-Flu Vax Paper Retracted

Narcolepsy-Flu Vax Paper Retracted

By | August 1, 2014

A study linking GlaxoSmithKline’s Pandemrix H1N1 vaccine to the sleep disorder has been pulled from the literature.

0 Comments

image: Meal Plans

Meal Plans

By | August 1, 2014

Bacterial populations’ differing strategies for responding to their environment can set genetic routes to speciation.

1 Comment

image: Misconduct Ruling for Old Retractions

Misconduct Ruling for Old Retractions

By | July 31, 2014

Zhihua Zou, formerly of Nobel Laureate Linda Buck’s lab, engaged in research misconduct that resulted in the retraction of two highly cited papers.

0 Comments

image: Super Sniffers?

Super Sniffers?

By | July 24, 2014

African elephants have more genes for olfactory receptors than dogs or humans, a study shows. 

1 Comment

Popular Now

  1. A Coral to Outlast Climate Change
  2. Antarctica Is Turning Green
  3. First In Vivo Human Genome Editing to Be Tested in New Clinical Trial
  4. How to Tell a Person’s “Brain Age”
AAAS