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The Scientist

» retraction and ecology

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image: Week in Review: November 30–December 4

Week in Review: November 30–December 4

By | December 4, 2015

Historic meeting on human gene editing; signs of obesity found in sperm epigenome; top 10 innovations of 2015; dealing with retractions

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image: A Rainforest Chorus

A Rainforest Chorus

By | December 1, 2015

Researchers measure the health of Papua New Guinea’s forests by analyzing the ecological soundscape.

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image: Jungle Field Trip

Jungle Field Trip

By | December 1, 2015

Travel to remote rain forests in Papua New Guinea with researchers from The Nature Conservancy who are working with native people to characterize ecosystems there using sound.

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image: Self Correction

Self Correction

By | December 1, 2015

What to do when you realize your publication is fatally flawed

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image: Urban Owl-Fitters

Urban Owl-Fitters

By | December 1, 2015

How birds with an innate propensity for living among humans are establishing populations in cities

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image: Spiders, Prey Leave DNA

Spiders, Prey Leave DNA

By | November 30, 2015

A study of black widow spiders suggests that the arachnids leave traces of their own genetic material and DNA from prey in their sticky webs.

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image: Another Retraction for Fake Nutrition Data

Another Retraction for Fake Nutrition Data

By | October 29, 2015

The BMJ yanks a study on baby formula from R.K. Chandra decades after it was published.

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image: Latest in Heart Stem Cell Debate

Latest in Heart Stem Cell Debate

By | October 26, 2015

Given the right environment, cKit+ cells from the mouse heart can develop into new cardiac muscle, according to a study.

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image: Parsing Negative Citations

Parsing Negative Citations

By | October 26, 2015

A new tool helps scientists better understand what happens to studies that are criticized in the literature.

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image: Buzzed Honeybees

Buzzed Honeybees

By | October 20, 2015

Caffeinated nectar makes bees more loyal to a food source, even when foraging there is suboptimal.

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