The Scientist

» retraction, evolution and immunology

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | April 1, 2016

Lab Girl, The Most Perfect Thing, Half-Earth, and Cosmosapiens

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image: Guts and Glory

Guts and Glory

By | April 1, 2016

An open mind and collaborative spirit have taken Hans Clevers on a journey from medicine to developmental biology, gastroenterology, cancer, and stem cells.

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image: Tumor Traps

Tumor Traps

By | April 1, 2016

After surgery to remove a tumor, neutrophils recruited to the site spit out sticky webs of DNA that aid cancer recurrence.

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image: Minimal Genome Created

Minimal Genome Created

By | March 24, 2016

Scientists build a living cellular organism with a genome smaller than any known in nature.

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image: Brains Before Brawn

Brains Before Brawn

By | March 16, 2016

A newly described horse-size relative of Tyrannosaurus rex may help settle the question of how massive carnivorous dinosaurs took shape throughout the eons.

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image: Less Chewing, More Doing

Less Chewing, More Doing

By | March 11, 2016

Food processing in early hominid populations might have played a key role in human evolution by increasing net energy uptake, researchers show.

3 Comments

image: More Support for Allergen-Exposure Strategy

More Support for Allergen-Exposure Strategy

By | March 8, 2016

A second study finds evidence that feeding children peanuts could help prevent them from developing allergies to the legume later in life.

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image: Paper Containing Creationist Language Pulled

Paper Containing Creationist Language Pulled

By | March 7, 2016

PLOS ONE says a breakdown in the peer-review process led to the publication of a now-retracted biomechanics paper that made reference to a “Creator.”

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image: Viral Remnants Help Regulate Human Immunity

Viral Remnants Help Regulate Human Immunity

By | March 3, 2016

Endogenous retroviruses in the human genome can regulate genes involved in innate immune responses.

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image: Amoebae Have Human-Like Immunity

Amoebae Have Human-Like Immunity

By | March 2, 2016

Dictyostelium discoideum produce extracellular nets that can kill bacteria, just as phagocytes in people and other higher animals do, according to a study.

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