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image: Paper Containing Creationist Language Pulled

Paper Containing Creationist Language Pulled

By | March 7, 2016

PLOS ONE says a breakdown in the peer-review process led to the publication of a now-retracted biomechanics paper that made reference to a “Creator.”

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image: Zika Infects Neural Progenitors

Zika Infects Neural Progenitors

By | March 4, 2016

Scientists provide a potential biological link between Zika virus infection and microcephaly.

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image: Viral Remnants Help Regulate Human Immunity

Viral Remnants Help Regulate Human Immunity

By | March 3, 2016

Endogenous retroviruses in the human genome can regulate genes involved in innate immune responses.

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image: Amoebae Have Human-Like Immunity

Amoebae Have Human-Like Immunity

By | March 2, 2016

Dictyostelium discoideum produce extracellular nets that can kill bacteria, just as phagocytes in people and other higher animals do, according to a study.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | March 1, 2016

Herding Hemingway's Cats, Hair: A Human History, Restless Creatures, and The Mind Club

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | March 1, 2016

Meet some of the people featured in the March 2016 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Slumber Numbers

Slumber Numbers

By | March 1, 2016

Ideas abound for why some animal species sleep so much more than others, but definitive data are elusive.

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image: Sugar Time

Sugar Time

By | March 1, 2016

Metabolic activity, not light, drives the circadian clock in cyanobacteria.

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image: Things That Go Bump

Things That Go Bump

By | March 1, 2016

Scientists still don’t know why animals sleep or how to define the ubiquitous behavior.

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image: What Lies Sleeping

What Lies Sleeping

By | March 1, 2016

Why can science still not define this most basic biological process?

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