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image: Eggs Trade Genes

Eggs Trade Genes

By | October 24, 2012

Swapping chromosomes from one human egg to another could eliminate mitochondrial DNA mutations that cause disease.

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image: Cloning Biologist Dies

Cloning Biologist Dies

By | October 12, 2012

Keith Campbell, a biologist who was part of the effort to clone Dolly the sheep, has passed away at the age of 58.

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image: Weeding Out Arsenate

Weeding Out Arsenate

By | October 3, 2012

A miniscule change in a hydrogen bond angle explains how bacteria can select phosphate over arsenate even in high-arsenate conditions.

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image: Home Cookin’

Home Cookin’

By | October 1, 2012

Laboratory-raised populations of dung beetles reveal a mother's extragenetic influence on the physiques of her sons.

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image: Neglected Babies Develop Less Myelin

Neglected Babies Develop Less Myelin

By | September 17, 2012

Mice raised in isolation from their mothers developed cognitive deficits similar to those of babies raised in orphanages where physical contact is infrequent.

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image: Finding Injury

Finding Injury

By | September 1, 2012

The brain’s phagocytes follow an ATP bread trail laid down by calcium waves to the site of damage.

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image: Down and Dirty

Down and Dirty

By | September 1, 2012

Diverse plant communities create a disease-fighting "soil genotype."

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image: Cancer-Causing Gut Bacteria

Cancer-Causing Gut Bacteria

By | August 17, 2012

Mice with inflammatory bowel disease harbor gut bacteria that damage host DNA, predisposing mice to cancer.

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image: Space-bound Fish

Space-bound Fish

By | July 31, 2012

Japanese astronauts deliver an aquarium to the International Space Station to study the effects of microgravity on marine life.

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image: Bacterial Exploitation

Bacterial Exploitation

By | July 5, 2012

Field studies reveal non-virulent bacteria take advantage of their virulent counterparts to get a free pass into their host.

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