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image: Source of Scales, Feathers, Hair

Source of Scales, Feathers, Hair

By | June 27, 2016

Reptiles, birds, and mammals all produce tiny, bump-like structures during development.   

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image: Dethroning <em>E. coli</em>?

Dethroning E. coli?

By | June 23, 2016

Some scientists hope to replace microbiology’s workhorse bacterium with fast-growing Vibrio natriegens.

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image: Speaking of Microbiology

Speaking of Microbiology

By | June 21, 2016

A selection of notable quotes from the American Society for Microbiology’s annual meeting

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image: Dental Microbes Not All in the Family

Dental Microbes Not All in the Family

By | June 20, 2016

Kids often acquire cavity-causing bacteria from non-family members, researchers report at the American Society for Microbiology annual meeting.

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image: Early-Life Microbiome

Early-Life Microbiome

By | June 16, 2016

Analyzing the gut microbiomes of children from birth through toddlerhood, researchers tie compositional changes to birth mode, infant diet, and antibiotic therapy.

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image: Evolution of Fish Bioluminescence

Evolution of Fish Bioluminescence

By | June 9, 2016

Fish evolved to make their own light at least 27 times, according to a study.

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A transposon underlies this classic story of evolutionary adaptation.

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image: Do Patents Promote or Stall Innovation?

Do Patents Promote or Stall Innovation?

By | June 1, 2016

A petition recently filed with the Supreme Court triggers renewed debate about the role of patents in the diagnostics sector.

3 Comments

image: Myriad, Post Mortem

Myriad, Post Mortem

By | June 1, 2016

David Schwartz of the Illinois Institute of Technology-Chicago, Kent College of Law, discusses the impact of the US Supreme Court unanimously striking down Myriad Genetics' patent of human BRCA genes and tests to detect mutations in them.

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image: Start Making Sense

Start Making Sense

By | June 1, 2016

Scientific progress is only achieved when humans' innate sense of understanding is validated by objective reality.

6 Comments

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