The Scientist

» gene patents and microbiology

Most Recent

image: Beach Reading

Beach Reading

By | July 1, 2013

A vacation from your lab doesn’t have to mean a break from fascinating developments on the life science front.

0 Comments

image: Contributors

Contributors

By | July 1, 2013

Meet some of the people featured in the July 2013 issue of The Scientist.

0 Comments

image: Crowd Control

Crowd Control

By | July 1, 2013

Molecules, cells, or vertebrates—when individuals move and act as a single unit, surprisingly complex behaviors arise that hint at the origins of multicellularity.

7 Comments

image: Image of the Day: <em>E. coli</em> Hunter

Image of the Day: E. coli Hunter

By | June 27, 2013

The Shiga toxin may help E. coli survive predation by the protist Tetrahymena.

0 Comments

image: Week in Review, June 17–21

Week in Review, June 17–21

By | June 21, 2013

On the gene patent decision; a high-res human brain model; bats’ influence on moths mating calls; toxicants threaten brain health; platelet-driven immunity

0 Comments

image: Gene Patents Decision: Everybody Wins

Gene Patents Decision: Everybody Wins

By | June 18, 2013

Last week’s Supreme Court decision to invalidate patents on human genes was a win for patients, independent researchers, and even the wider biotech industry.

4 Comments

image: Opinion: On Patenting Genes

Opinion: On Patenting Genes

By | June 18, 2013

The scientific community and the impact of the Myriad Genetics Supreme Court decision

1 Comment

image: Supreme Court Nixes Patenting Human Genes

Supreme Court Nixes Patenting Human Genes

By | June 13, 2013

The Justices have decided that isolated sequences of human DNA are not eligible for patent protection, but rules that artificial sequences can be patented.  

4 Comments

image: Mobile Microscopes

Mobile Microscopes

By | June 1, 2013

Turning cell phones into basic research tools can improve health care in the developing world.

5 Comments

image: Oral History

Oral History

By | June 1, 2013

Researchers use DNA from ancient tooth tartar to chart changes in the bacterial communities that have lived in human mouths for 8,000 years.

1 Comment

Popular Now

  1. Next Generation: Nanotube Scaffolds Reconnect Spinal Neurons
  2. Mapping the Human Connectome
    Daily News Mapping the Human Connectome

    A new map of human cortex combines data from multiple imaging modalities and comprises 180 distinct regions.

  3. Will Organs-in-a-Dish Ever Replace Animal Models?
  4. Your Office Has a Distinct Microbiome
RayBiotech