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In Chapter 3, “From Mating to Conception,” author Robert Martin explores the question of why humans and other primates frequently engage in sexual intercourse when females are not fertile.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | July 1, 2013

Denial, Probably Approximately Correct, Permanent Present Tense, and Against Their Will

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Contributors

By | July 1, 2013

Meet some of the people featured in the July 2013 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Widening the Fertile Window

Widening the Fertile Window

By | July 1, 2013

Women may be able to store viable sperm for longer than a week, thus contributing to apparent variability in pregnancy lengths.

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The Art of Science

By | June 21, 2013

Princeton scientists and engineers create a stunning collection of scientific images better suited for a gallery than a lab meeting.

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image: Week in Review, June 17–21

Week in Review, June 17–21

By | June 21, 2013

On the gene patent decision; a high-res human brain model; bats’ influence on moths mating calls; toxicants threaten brain health; platelet-driven immunity

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image: Gene Patents Decision: Everybody Wins

Gene Patents Decision: Everybody Wins

By | June 18, 2013

Last week’s Supreme Court decision to invalidate patents on human genes was a win for patients, independent researchers, and even the wider biotech industry.

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image: Opinion: On Patenting Genes

Opinion: On Patenting Genes

By | June 18, 2013

The scientific community and the impact of the Myriad Genetics Supreme Court decision

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image: Supreme Court Nixes Patenting Human Genes

Supreme Court Nixes Patenting Human Genes

By | June 13, 2013

The Justices have decided that isolated sequences of human DNA are not eligible for patent protection, but rules that artificial sequences can be patented.  

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image: Nailing Regeneration

Nailing Regeneration

By | June 12, 2013

Researchers identify the signaling program that enables finger and toenail stem cells to direct digit regeneration after amputation.

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