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» gene patents and developmental biology

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image: Bacterial Quid Pro Quo

Bacterial Quid Pro Quo

By | August 19, 2013

Pseudomonas aeruginosa gather swarming speed at the expense of their ability to form biofilms in an experimental evolution setup.

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image: Stem Cells Open Up Options

Stem Cells Open Up Options

By | August 13, 2013

Pluripotent cells can help regenerate tissues and maintain long life—and they may also help animals jumpstart drastically new lifestyles.

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Speaking of Science

By | August 1, 2013

August 2013's selection of notable quotes

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image: Another Lawsuit over Genetic Tests

Another Lawsuit over Genetic Tests

By | July 11, 2013

Myriad Genetics, the company originally behind tests for the cancer-associated BRCA mutations, is suing two competitors for patent infringement.

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image: Beach Reading

Beach Reading

By | July 1, 2013

A vacation from your lab doesn’t have to mean a break from fascinating developments on the life science front.

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Contributors

By | July 1, 2013

Meet some of the people featured in the July 2013 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Week in Review, June 17–21

Week in Review, June 17–21

By | June 21, 2013

On the gene patent decision; a high-res human brain model; bats’ influence on moths mating calls; toxicants threaten brain health; platelet-driven immunity

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image: Gene Patents Decision: Everybody Wins

Gene Patents Decision: Everybody Wins

By | June 18, 2013

Last week’s Supreme Court decision to invalidate patents on human genes was a win for patients, independent researchers, and even the wider biotech industry.

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image: Opinion: On Patenting Genes

Opinion: On Patenting Genes

By | June 18, 2013

The scientific community and the impact of the Myriad Genetics Supreme Court decision

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image: Supreme Court Nixes Patenting Human Genes

Supreme Court Nixes Patenting Human Genes

By | June 13, 2013

The Justices have decided that isolated sequences of human DNA are not eligible for patent protection, but rules that artificial sequences can be patented.  

4 Comments

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