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image: Science Celebrities: Where Are the Women?

Science Celebrities: Where Are the Women?

By | May 15, 2017

Men have traditionally stolen the spotlight as scientific popularizers on TV, but women are making names for themselves in other formats.

6 Comments

National opinions about the effectiveness of last month’s science and climate marches are mixed and follow political lines, a Pew survey reports.

2 Comments

image: Macron’s Election Win Cheered by Scientists

Macron’s Election Win Cheered by Scientists

By | May 8, 2017

The future French president’s goals are pro-science, yet he will need parliamentary support.

0 Comments

image: Book Excerpt from <em>Flavor</em>

Book Excerpt from Flavor

By | May 1, 2017

Author Bob Holmes dove into the taste-determining realm of his genome.

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The 19th century biologist’s drawings, tainted by scandal, helped bolster, then later dismiss, his biogenetic law.

3 Comments

Time-lapse imaging shows the immune cells transferring chemical signals during pigment pattern formation in developing zebrafish.

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image: Why I Had My Sense of Flavor Genotyped

Why I Had My Sense of Flavor Genotyped

By | May 1, 2017

One person’s quest to get to the bottom of the unique way he experiences food

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image: Infographic: How the Zebrafish Got Its Stripes

Infographic: How the Zebrafish Got Its Stripes

By | May 1, 2017

Immune cells called macrophages shuttle cellular messages in the skin.

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image: Notable Science Quotes

Notable Science Quotes

By | May 1, 2017

Climate change, research funding, race, and much more

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image: Reactions to the March for Science

Reactions to the March for Science

By | April 25, 2017

The Scientist’s Bob Grant caught up with demonstrators who participated in the March for Science in Washington, DC, on April 22.

1 Comment

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