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image: Reactions to Proposed EPA, NIH Budget Cuts

Reactions to Proposed EPA, NIH Budget Cuts

By | March 3, 2017

Experts discuss how Trump’s budget proposals could affect federally employed and federally funded scientists.

2 Comments

image: Study: Most Long Noncoding RNAs Likely Functional

Study: Most Long Noncoding RNAs Likely Functional

By | March 2, 2017

Nearly 20,000 lncRNAs identified in human cells may play some role in cellular activities.

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image: Scientists to Trump: Appoint a Science Advisor

Scientists to Trump: Appoint a Science Advisor

By | March 1, 2017

Thousands of researchers and science supporters sign an open letter to the president.

4 Comments

image: A Selection of CRISPR Proof-of-Principle Studies

A Selection of CRISPR Proof-of-Principle Studies

By | March 1, 2017

Advice on how to deploy the latest techniques in your own lab

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image: How Bad Singing Landed Me in an MRI Machine

How Bad Singing Landed Me in an MRI Machine

By | March 1, 2017

One author's journey through the science of his congenital amusia

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image: Massively Parallel Perturbations

Massively Parallel Perturbations

By | March 1, 2017

Scientists combine CRISPR gene editing with single-cell sequencing for genotype-phenotype screens.

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image: Musical Tastes: Nature or Nurture?

Musical Tastes: Nature or Nurture?

By | March 1, 2017

Studies of remote Amazonian villages reveal how culture influences our musical preferences.

1 Comment

image: Notable Science Quotes

Notable Science Quotes

By | March 1, 2017

Music, the future of American science, and more

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An experiment in which people pass each other initially nonrhythmic drumming sequences reveals the human affinity for musical patterns.

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image: Infographic: Single-Cell CRISPR Screens

Infographic: Single-Cell CRISPR Screens

By | March 1, 2017

See how two new methods track responses to unique genetic manipulations in numerous individual cells in parallel.

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