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image: Valerie Horsley Gets Under Skin

Valerie Horsley Gets Under Skin

By | May 1, 2017

The Yale University cell and molecular biologist is probing the deep mysteries of epidermal cells.

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image: Infographic: Proteasome Basics

Infographic: Proteasome Basics

By | May 1, 2017

The structure and function of the cell's protein-degrading machine

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Studies of infected rhesus monkeys reveal the virus’s long-term hiding places in the body.

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image: Reactions to the March for Science

Reactions to the March for Science

By | April 25, 2017

The Scientist’s Bob Grant caught up with demonstrators who participated in the March for Science in Washington, DC, on April 22.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>The Politics of Cancer</em>

Book Excerpt from The Politics of Cancer

By | April 1, 2017

In Chapter 2, “Identifying the Culprits,” author Wendy Whitman Cobb describes how small-government, anti-regulation conservatism can hinder the fight against cancer.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | April 1, 2017

Meet some of the people featured in the April 2017 issue of The Scientist.

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Mice engineered to overproduce the organelles involved in cell division spontaneously develop malignancies.

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image: Hitting It Out of the Park

Hitting It Out of the Park

By | April 1, 2017

Cancer can be as evasive and slippery as a spitball, but new immunotherapies are starting to connect.

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image: How Will Cancer Research Fare Under Trump?

How Will Cancer Research Fare Under Trump?

By | April 1, 2017

The new administration has not yet made its intentions clear.

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image: Location, Location, Location

Location, Location, Location

By | April 1, 2017

Since first proposing that a cell’s function and biology depend on its surroundings, Mina Bissell continues to probe the role of the extracellular matrix.

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