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image: How Plants Evolved to Eat Meat

How Plants Evolved to Eat Meat

By | February 7, 2017

Pitcher plants across different continents acquired their tastes for meat in similar ways.

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image: Scientific Societies Respond to Trump Immigration Order

Scientific Societies Respond to Trump Immigration Order

By | February 2, 2017

More than 150 scientific societies have objected to the new president’s executive order, arguing that it will hinder international collaboration and make America less competitive

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image: Artificial Cells Talk to Real Ones

Artificial Cells Talk to Real Ones

By | February 1, 2017

Nonliving cells developed in the lab can communicate chemically with living bacteria, according to a study.

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image: Trump’s Crackdown on Federal Regulations

Trump’s Crackdown on Federal Regulations

By | February 1, 2017

The President has signed an executive order requiring that federal agencies, including the FDA, to cut two regulations for every new one they adopt.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | February 1, 2017

Meet some of the people featured in the February 2017 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Plant Photoreceptor Doubles as a Thermometer

Plant Photoreceptor Doubles as a Thermometer

By | February 1, 2017

Warmth acts on a light-sensing protein similarly to the way shade does, setting off a growth spurt in plant seedlings.

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image: Infographic: Dual-Purpose Photoreceptor

Infographic: Dual-Purpose Photoreceptor

By | February 1, 2017

See how different environmental conditions affect the activity of a molecule sensitive to both light and temperature.

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image: Infographic: Following the Force

Infographic: Following the Force

By | February 1, 2017

Physical forces propagate from the outside of cells inward and vice versa.

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image: RNA Interference Between Kingdoms

RNA Interference Between Kingdoms

By | February 1, 2017

Plants and fungi can use conserved RNA interference machinery to regulate each other’s gene expression—and scientists think they can make use of this phenomenon to create a new generation of pesticides.

6 Comments

image: May the Force Be with You

May the Force Be with You

By | February 1, 2017

The dissection of how cells sense and propagate physical forces is leading to exciting new tools and discoveries in mechanobiology and mechanomedicine.

3 Comments

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