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image: Creating a DNA Record with CRISPR

Creating a DNA Record with CRISPR

By | June 9, 2016

Researchers repurpose a bacterial immune system to be a molecular recording device.

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image: Generating Cardiac Precursor Cells

Generating Cardiac Precursor Cells

By | June 1, 2016

Researchers derive cardiac precursors to form cardiac muscle, endothelial, and smooth muscle cells in mice.

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image: Notable Science Quotes

Notable Science Quotes

By | June 1, 2016

14-day-old embryos, prioritizing biodiversity, and more

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image: The Fatty Acid–Ketone Switch

The Fatty Acid–Ketone Switch

By | June 1, 2016

In failing hearts, cardiomyocytes change their fuel preference.

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image: In Failing Hearts, Cardiomyocytes Alter Metabolism

In Failing Hearts, Cardiomyocytes Alter Metabolism

By | June 1, 2016

While the heart cells normally burn fatty acids, when things go wrong ketones become the preferred fuel source.

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image: Editing Genomes to Record Cellular Histories

Editing Genomes to Record Cellular Histories

By | May 26, 2016

Researchers harness the power of genome editing to track cell lineages throughout zebrafish development.

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image: E.U. Delays Vote on Roundup

E.U. Delays Vote on Roundup

By | May 24, 2016

Newly published research on the key ingredient in the Monsanto-made weed killer is holding up lawmakers’ decisions on whether to continue to allow its sale in Europe.

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image: Zika Update

Zika Update

By | May 13, 2016

US government contemplates public health funding; World Health Organization advises summer Olympics attendees

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image: Brazilian Science Ministry Downgraded

Brazilian Science Ministry Downgraded

By | May 12, 2016

Interim President Michel Temer fuses the country’s science and telecommunications ministries amid funding cuts.

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image: Embryo Watch

Embryo Watch

By | May 5, 2016

A new culture system allows researchers to track the development of human embryos in vitro for nearly two weeks.

1 Comment

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