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The Stanford University psychiatrist and neuroscientist known for his contributions to optogenetics and tissue clearing is awarded €4 million by the Fresenius Research Prize.

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image: Binge-Eating Neurons Identified

Binge-Eating Neurons Identified

By | May 26, 2017

Inducing activity in the zona incerta region of the brain prompts mice to gorge themselves.

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Smarty Genes

By | May 23, 2017

Scientists have identified 40 new genes linked to human intelligence.

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National opinions about the effectiveness of last month’s science and climate marches are mixed and follow political lines, a Pew survey reports.

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image: Image of the Day: Missing Pieces

Image of the Day: Missing Pieces

By | May 12, 2017

Researchers made a 3-D reconstruction of one of neurobiology's most famous brains—that of Henry Gustav Molaison (HM).

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image: Macron’s Election Win Cheered by Scientists

Macron’s Election Win Cheered by Scientists

By | May 8, 2017

The future French president’s goals are pro-science, yet he will need parliamentary support.

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image: Quick and Cheap Zika Detection

Quick and Cheap Zika Detection

By | May 3, 2017

A heat block, a truck battery, and a novel RNA amplification assay make for in-the-field surveillance of the virus.

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image: Computers That Can Smell

Computers That Can Smell

By | May 1, 2017

Teams of modelers compete to develop algorithms for estimating how people will perceive a particular odor from its molecular characteristics.

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Contributors

By | May 1, 2017

Meet some of the people featured in the May 2017 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Glia Guru

Glia Guru

By | May 1, 2017

Ben Barres recast glial cells from supporting actors to star performers, crucial for synaptic plasticity in the brain and for preventing neurodegenerative disorders.

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