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image: The Celiac Surge

The Celiac Surge

By | June 1, 2017

A rapid increase in the global incidence of the condition has researchers scrambling to understand the causes of the trend, and cope with the consequences.

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National opinions about the effectiveness of last month’s science and climate marches are mixed and follow political lines, a Pew survey reports.

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image: Macron’s Election Win Cheered by Scientists

Macron’s Election Win Cheered by Scientists

By | May 8, 2017

The future French president’s goals are pro-science, yet he will need parliamentary support.

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image: Quick and Cheap Zika Detection

Quick and Cheap Zika Detection

By | May 3, 2017

A heat block, a truck battery, and a novel RNA amplification assay make for in-the-field surveillance of the virus.

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image: Polio Vaccine Pioneer Dies

Polio Vaccine Pioneer Dies

By | May 2, 2017

Julius Youngner collaborated with Jonas Salk on the polio vaccine, and later identified interferon gamma and contributed to an equine influenza vaccine.

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Time-lapse imaging shows the immune cells transferring chemical signals during pigment pattern formation in developing zebrafish.

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image: Infographic: How the Zebrafish Got Its Stripes

Infographic: How the Zebrafish Got Its Stripes

By | May 1, 2017

Immune cells called macrophages shuttle cellular messages in the skin.

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Studies of infected rhesus monkeys reveal the virus’s long-term hiding places in the body.

1 Comment

image: Reactions to the March for Science

Reactions to the March for Science

By | April 25, 2017

The Scientist’s Bob Grant caught up with demonstrators who participated in the March for Science in Washington, DC, on April 22.

1 Comment

image: Viral Trigger for Celiac Disease?

Viral Trigger for Celiac Disease?

By | April 6, 2017

A common, seemingly benign human virus can trigger an immune response that leads to celiac disease in a mouse model, researchers show. 

3 Comments

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