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image: $32K to Swim in Polluted River

$32K to Swim in Polluted River

By | February 19, 2013

A Chinese businessman offers a government official a large monetary reward to take a dip in a river that runs through the town of Ruian.


image: Stem Cell Trial Nearly Approved

Stem Cell Trial Nearly Approved

By | February 15, 2013

The first human trial of a treatment using induced pluripotent stem cells has received conditional approval from an institutional review board in Japan.


image: EU Plans Research Budget

EU Plans Research Budget

By | February 12, 2013

Under new plans to reduce the European Union’s overall spending, science funding did relatively well, but research leaders want more—and they may well get it.


image: Opinion: From Polymerase to Politics

Opinion: From Polymerase to Politics

By | February 11, 2013

Why so few scientists make the leap to policy-making positions, and why more should give it a try


image: German Politician’s PhD Revoked

German Politician’s PhD Revoked

By | February 7, 2013

The German minister for science and education has been stripped of her PhD after she was found guilty of plagiarizing chunks of the dissertation she wrote in 1980.


image: Stem Cells: Safe Haven For TB

Stem Cells: Safe Haven For TB

By | February 5, 2013

Tuberculosis bacteria find shelter from drugs and the body’s defenses in bone marrow stem cells.


image: Opinion: Health Booth 2020

Opinion: Health Booth 2020

By | February 4, 2013

Using a SMART card containing your genetic information and medical history, you could one day soon be diagnosed and treated for all kinds of diseases at an ATM-style kiosk.


image: Energy Secretary to Step Down

Energy Secretary to Step Down

By | February 4, 2013

After a 4-year stretch as US Energy Secretary, during which he fought to fund research on clean energy technology, Steven Chu has announced his resignation.


image: A Chill Issue

A Chill Issue

By | February 1, 2013

The very cold, the merely chilled, and the colorful


image: Cholera Confusion, circa 1832

Cholera Confusion, circa 1832

By | February 1, 2013

As cholera first tore through the Europe in the mid-19th century, people tried anything to prevent the deadly disease. Then science stepped in.


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