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image: Tactical Maneuvers

Tactical Maneuvers

By | June 1, 2014

Scientists are creating viruses that naturally home in on tumor cells while simultaneously boosting the body’s immune system to fight cancer.

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image: Targeting Tumors with Viruses

Targeting Tumors with Viruses

By | June 1, 2014

Stephanie Swift discusses the strategy of fighting cancer with viruses.

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image: Kavli Congrats

Kavli Congrats

By | May 30, 2014

A nonet of scientists, including researchers in nano-optics and in the neuroscience of memory, earned the 2014 Kavli prizes.

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image: Brains vs. Biceps?

Brains vs. Biceps?

By | May 29, 2014

Early humans may have made an evolutionary tradeoff, giving up muscular strength to fuel bigger brains.

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image: Parsing the Penis Microbiome

Parsing the Penis Microbiome

By | May 29, 2014

Circumcision and sexual activity are but two factors that can influence the bacterial communities that inhabit male genitalia.

5 Comments

image: Immunology and Neurology Pioneer Dies

Immunology and Neurology Pioneer Dies

By | May 24, 2014

Gerald Edelman, who broke new ground in two distinct fields of life science, has passed away at age 84.

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image: Week in Review: May 19–23

Week in Review: May 19–23

By | May 23, 2014

Sperm-sex–sensing sows; blocking a pain receptor extends lifespan in mice; stop codons can code for amino acids; exploring the tumor exome

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image: When Stop Means Go

When Stop Means Go

By | May 22, 2014

A survey of trillions of base pairs of microbial DNA reveals a considerable degree of stop codon reassignment.

2 Comments

image: No Pain, Big Gain

No Pain, Big Gain

By | May 22, 2014

Eliminating a pain receptor makes mice live longer and keeps their metabolisms young.

3 Comments

image: Border Collies vs. <em>E. coli</em>

Border Collies vs. E. coli

By | May 21, 2014

A study shows that the herding dogs can be an effective means of controlling bacterial infections spread by seagulls.

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