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image: Small Wonders

Small Wonders

By | September 11, 2014

Sangeeta Bhatia, creator of miniature medical technologies, has won the Lemelson-MIT Prize.

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image: Watson to Match Patients to Clinical Trials

Watson to Match Patients to Clinical Trials

By | September 8, 2014

IBM’s cognitive computer will be individualizing trial plans for cancer patients at the Mayo Clinic.

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image: FDA Gives Nod to Melanoma Drug

FDA Gives Nod to Melanoma Drug

By | September 8, 2014

The US Food and Drug Administration last week approved the first of a new type of immunotherapy that aims to pit a patient’s own immune system against her cancer.

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image: Brain Genetics Paper Retracted

Brain Genetics Paper Retracted

By | September 4, 2014

A study that identified genes linked to communication between different areas of the brain has been retracted by its authors because of statistical flaws. 

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image: Filling In the Notes

Filling In the Notes

By | September 1, 2014

Why the brain produces musical hallucinations

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image: TS Live: Handy Apes

TS Live: Handy Apes

By | September 1, 2014

Studying handedness in chimps may shed light on the mysterious trait in humans.

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image: Light-Activated Memory Switch

Light-Activated Memory Switch

By | August 27, 2014

Scientists use optogenetics to swap out negative memories for positive ones—and vice versa—in mice.

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image: Subglacial Ecosystem

Subglacial Ecosystem

By | August 22, 2014

Samples from an Antarctic lake 800 meters below the ice reveal an abundance of microbial life.

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image: Viral Demise of an Algal Bloom

Viral Demise of an Algal Bloom

By | August 21, 2014

Marine viruses may be key players in the death of massive algal blooms that emerge in the ocean, a study shows.

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image: Lab-Grown 3-D Brain Tissue Mimics Cortex

Lab-Grown 3-D Brain Tissue Mimics Cortex

By | August 11, 2014

From cortical neurons, researchers have engineered rat tissue that formed complex networks of functioning neurons and appeared to behave normally after an injury.

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