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image: Cancer Research Advocate Dies

Cancer Research Advocate Dies

By | March 5, 2013

A champion of breast cancer awareness in the African-American community passes away at 63.

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image: Antibody-Dependent Enhanced (ADE) Immunity

Antibody-Dependent Enhanced (ADE) Immunity

By | March 2, 2013

The method to the dengue virus's maddening infectiousness.

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image: Little Cancer Risk from Fukushima

Little Cancer Risk from Fukushima

By | March 1, 2013

A new report from the World Health Organization predicts only very minimal increases in cancer risk for residents in the vicinity of the nuclear disaster.

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image: Bacterial Buddies

Bacterial Buddies

By | March 1, 2013

A chance encounter with a crab apple tree leads to the discovery of a new bacterial species and clues to the evolution of insect endosymbionts.

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image: Blue Biotech

Blue Biotech

By | March 1, 2013

Systems biologist Lone Gram describes her approach to combing the oceans for novel compounds that may be useful in the fight against pathogens.

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image: Sea Change

Sea Change

By | March 1, 2013

A normally land-based microbiologist sets sail to find the building blocks of novel antibiotics in marine bacteria.

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image: Bedeviled by Dengue

Bedeviled by Dengue

By | March 1, 2013

The global spread of dengue virus has immunologists and public-health experts debating the best way to curb infection.

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image: Do Mice Make Bad Models?

Do Mice Make Bad Models?

By | February 11, 2013

A study suggests that some mouse models do not accurately mimic human molecular mechanisms of inflammatory response, but other mouse strains may fare better.

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image: Fat Dads’ Epigenetic Legacy

Fat Dads’ Epigenetic Legacy

By | February 7, 2013

Children with obese fathers show epigenetic changes that may affect their health.

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image: Stem Cells: Safe Haven For TB

Stem Cells: Safe Haven For TB

By | February 5, 2013

Tuberculosis bacteria find shelter from drugs and the body’s defenses in bone marrow stem cells.

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