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image: The Wound Microbiome

The Wound Microbiome

By | June 23, 2014

Determining which critters are present in an infected wound could aid in treatment, particularly of soldiers injured in combat.

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image: Re-examining Rots

Re-examining Rots

By | June 23, 2014

Fungi that digest wood in novel ways could fuel new avenues of research on cellulosic ethanol, and suggest a need to move beyond traditional classification systems.  

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image: Protein Clumps Spread Inflammation

Protein Clumps Spread Inflammation

By | June 22, 2014

ASC specks—protein aggregations that drive inflammation—are released from dying immune cells, expanding the reach of a defense response.

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image: Cancer Research ROI

Cancer Research ROI

By | June 16, 2014

Report quantifies the returns from the U.K.’s investments in oncology.

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image: Week in Review: June 9–13

Week in Review: June 9–13

By | June 13, 2014

Ancient apoptotic pathway connects humans to coral; lab-grown, light-sensing retinal tissue; tracking cancer with synthetic phospholipids; diving deep into the lung microbiome

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image: Stress, Bacteria Trigger Heart Attack?

Stress, Bacteria Trigger Heart Attack?

By | June 12, 2014

A study implicates the breaking up of bacterial biofilms on fatty plaques in arteries as causing stroke or heart attack following stress.

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Scientists generate tumor-targeting molecules that can be used for imaging and treatment.

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image: Genome Digest

Genome Digest

By | June 11, 2014

What researchers are learning as they sequence, map, and decode species’ genomes

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image: Ancient Apoptosis

Ancient Apoptosis

By | June 9, 2014

Humans and coral share a cell-death pathway that has been conserved between them for more than half a billion years.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | June 1, 2014

Meet some of the people featured in the June 2014 issue of The Scientist

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