The Scientist

» cancer, microbiology and developmental biology

Most Recent

image: Rare T Cells Fight Cancer

Rare T Cells Fight Cancer

By | May 1, 2017

A new approach to immunotherapy finds that the immune-cell clonotypes that come to the rescue start out at very low frequencies.

0 Comments

image: Infographic: How the Zebrafish Got Its Stripes

Infographic: How the Zebrafish Got Its Stripes

By | May 1, 2017

Immune cells called macrophages shuttle cellular messages in the skin.

0 Comments

The giant lizards have numerous microbicidal compounds in their blood.

0 Comments

By implanting patient- or rodent-derived mini-guts into mice, scientists can rapidly create more-accurate murine models of the disease

0 Comments

The lungs of extremely premature lambs supported in a closed, sterile environment that enables fluid-based gas exchange grow and develop normally, researchers report.

0 Comments

image: Image of the Day: Stop Signals

Image of the Day: Stop Signals

By | April 17, 2017

Transcytosis, suppression of vesicle traffic across cells, helps reduce permeability in the blood-retinal barrier during development.

0 Comments

image: Consilience, Episode 3: Cancer, Obscured

Consilience, Episode 3: Cancer, Obscured

By | April 14, 2017

Ben Henry explores the science behind a deep-fried cancer scare and traditional treatments that may shrink tumors.

0 Comments

A mouse study reveals a causal link between changes in intestinal microbiota and increasing inflammation as the rodents age.

0 Comments

Mice exposed to low doses of penicillin in utero or as young pups exhibited long-term behavioral differences not seen in their non-exposed counterparts, according to a study.

0 Comments

Recolonizing middle-aged animals with bacteria from younger ones kept killifish alive longer than usual, researchers report.

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Running on Empty
    Features Running on Empty

    Regularly taking breaks from eating—for hours or days—can trigger changes both expected, such as in metabolic dynamics and inflammation, and surprising, as in immune system function and cancer progression.

  2. Athletes’ Microbiomes Differ from Nonathletes
  3. Mutation Linked to Longer Life Span in Men
  4. Gut Feeling
    Daily News Gut Feeling

    Sensory cells of the mouse intestine let the brain know if certain compounds are present by speaking directly to gut neurons via serotonin.

AAAS