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image: Decoding Breast Cancer Drug Resistance

Decoding Breast Cancer Drug Resistance

By | November 3, 2013

Common mutations in metastasized breast tumors suggest how the cancer can develop resistance to frontline drugs.

2 Comments

image: Thomas Gregor: Biological Quantifier

Thomas Gregor: Biological Quantifier

By | November 1, 2013

Assistant Professor, Physics, Princeton University. Age: 39

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image: About Face

About Face

By | October 25, 2013

Researchers show that genetic enhancer elements likely contribute to face shape in mice.

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image: It’s in the Genes

It’s in the Genes

By | October 24, 2013

Researchers find strong correlations between the composition of the human microbiome and genetic variation in immune-related pathways.

4 Comments

image: Clocking Epigenetics

Clocking Epigenetics

By | October 22, 2013

DNA methylation status can predict age in various human tissues, a study shows.

1 Comment

image: A Dire Air Pollution Warning

A Dire Air Pollution Warning

By | October 21, 2013

Contaminants in the air are officially carcinogens, according to the World Health Organization.

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image: Secret Botulism Paper Published

Secret Botulism Paper Published

By | October 18, 2013

The discovery of a new form of the deadly botulinum toxin gets published, but its sequence is kept under wraps until an antidote is developed.

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image: Testicular-Skin Cancer Tradeoff

Testicular-Skin Cancer Tradeoff

By | October 14, 2013

A genetic mutation tied to risk of developing testicular cancer may be more prevalent in white men because it also confers a reduced risk of developing skin cancer.

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image: Week in Review: October 7–11

Week in Review: October 7–11

By | October 11, 2013

Nobels awarded for vesicle trafficking and computational chemistry; building 3-D microbial communities; mislabeled microbes cause retractions

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image: Building 3-D Microbial Communities

Building 3-D Microbial Communities

By | October 7, 2013

Researchers apply a 3-D printing technique to structure populations of bacteria in a three-dimensional environment.

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