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image: How Cancers Evolve Drug Resistance

How Cancers Evolve Drug Resistance

By | April 1, 2017

Researchers unravel the sophisticated ways cancers evade treatments, including immunotherapies, designed to destroy them.

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image: Neoantigens Enable Personalized Cancer Immunotherapy

Neoantigens Enable Personalized Cancer Immunotherapy

By | April 1, 2017

Tumors’ mutations can encode the seeds of their own destruction, in the form of immunogenic peptides recognized by T cells.

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While studying the progression of healthy cells into cancerous ones, researchers discover a way to engraft human blood cells into animals.

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image: Starvation Response Triggers Melanoma Invasion

Starvation Response Triggers Melanoma Invasion

By | April 1, 2017

Through similar mechanisms, amino acid depletion in culture and cytokine activity in the tumor microenvironment prompt cancer cells to metastasize.

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image: Infographic: Antibody Cancer Therapy

Infographic: Antibody Cancer Therapy

By | April 1, 2017

An experimental technique removes T cells that aid in vitro tumor growth.

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image: Infographic: Inside Melanoma Invasion

Infographic: Inside Melanoma Invasion

By | April 1, 2017

See what cytokine activity and cellular starvation have to do with cancer metastasis.

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image: Infographic: Mechanisms of Resistance

Infographic: Mechanisms of Resistance

By | April 1, 2017

Cancers appear to be able to evolve resistance to many of the therapies doctors have tried.

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image: Infographic: Targeting Cancer Antigens

Infographic: Targeting Cancer Antigens

By | April 1, 2017

Neoantigens may serve as valuable targets for new immunotherapies.

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image: Targeting Tregs Halts Cancer’s Immune Helpers

Targeting Tregs Halts Cancer’s Immune Helpers

By | April 1, 2017

New monoclonal antibodies kill both cancer-promoting immunosuppressive cells and tumor cells in culture.

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image: In Certain Social Bees, Gut Microbiomes Follow Phylogeny

In Certain Social Bees, Gut Microbiomes Follow Phylogeny

By | March 29, 2017

Corbiculate bees and their gut-dwelling microbes have been coevolving since the social species evolved from their solitary ancestors around 80 million years ago, scientists suggest. 

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